Fevers

Many infants and children develop high fevers with minor viral illnesses. Fever is an
important part of the body’s defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that
cause infections in people thrive best at 98.6 °F.1 The American Academy of Pediatrics
describes that fever is not a disease, but a sign that your body is doing what it’s supposed
to do to fight infection. They quote: “Fever is not an illness, rather, it is a symptom of
sickness and is usually a positive sign that the body is fighting infection.”
In 1980 Dr. Barton D. Schmitt published an article in the journal Pediatrics and Adolescent
Medicine concluding that most parents (52%) have “fever phobia” in which they believe
that moderate fevers cause serious neurological effects and brain damage. Therefore
most were likely to treat a fever aggressively: 85% gave drugs to reduce the fever.2 In
2001, a group at John Hopkins revisited this work of Dr. Schmitt and concluded that the
fears and misconceptions of parents still persist.3
Seizures, caused by fever (febrile), do not occur in most children, and although they can
be frightening to parents, the vast majority of febrile seizures are short and harmless.
According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, there is no
evidence that short febrile seizures cause brain damage. Large studies have found that
children with febrile seizures have normal school achievement and perform well on
intellectual tests. Brain damage from a fever should not be of concern and generally will
not occur unless the fever is over 107.6 °F (42 °C).1 Health care providers have an impact
on parental understanding of fever and its severity. Medical care practices may need to
inquire about educational interventions concerning fever and its role in illness.
It is rare for a fever to rise higher than 104 or 105 degrees F, and as long as your child
does not seem distressed, there is no harm in letting a fever run its course. Fevers tend to
spike in the late afternoon and evening, so a slight increase in fever during this time is not
necessarily cause for alarm4. Fevers caused by infection will rarely go over 105 °F unless
the child is overdressed or trapped in a hot place. With that in mind, do not bundle
someone up who has the chills, and be sure to remove excess clothing and blankets.
There are many benefits of having a fever when a child or adult is experiencing flu-like
symptoms. Many of these benefits help ward off the cause of the illness. Antibodies and
white blood cells typically elevate in order to fight off the virus or bacteria. Therefore,
lowering a fever with medications is not recommended. Medications can cause potential
side effects including liver damage and stomach upset. Febrile lowering drugs can also
mask your symptoms telling you to return to work or play before the body is ready.
Medications may actually prolong the illness. A series of vaccine studies done at the
University of Maryland concluded that aspirin and acetaminophen suppressed production
of antibodies and increased cold symptoms, lengthening the time of infection. The current
study compared the duration of illness in those who received the medication with those
who did not and found that flu sufferers who took one of the anti-fever medications were
sick an average of 3.5 days longer than people who did not take either of the drugs5.
However, there is a time and a place to seek medical attention. Necessity of intervention
is recommended if there is presence of the following:
· Fever in an infant younger than 3 months (at any temperature)
· Fever above 102.2 degrees F in children between 3 months and 36 months, if
they appear ill
· Anytime a fever rises over 104.5 degrees F

To Prevent Colds & Flu (Adults 150+lbs)
1. Wash your hands! Good sanitary habits are important.
2. Strictly avoid all dairy products: review our March 2008 and April 2008 newsletters on Dairy.
3. Stay hydrated: drink 1 qt of water per 50lbs of body weight not to go over 3 qts per day.
4. Get adequate protein: 1 out of 4 bites should be good protein sources like seeds, nuts, sprouts,
quinoa, chicken, eggs, fish, etc.
5. Reduce/eliminate non-nutritive and refined foods. Bacterium love sugar!
6. Exercise at least 30 minutes, 3 days per week.
7. Supplementation (spread dosages throughout the day & take with meals)
· Take a high potency multiple.
· Lauricidin: one scoop each day.
· Vitamin C: 3000mg each day.
· Vitamin D3: 5000IU (cholecalciferol) each day…especially in winter months.
· Zinc lozenge: one 15mg lozenge per day.
Prevention for kids (40-100lbs)
· 1-6 are the same
· Supplementation (spread dosages throughout the day & take with meals)
· Take a high potency multiple for kids.
· Lauricidin (aka: Monolaurin): ½ scoop each day.
· Vitamin C: 500-1000mg each day. Try Emergen-C or Child Life Vitamin C for kids.
· Vitamin D3: 1000IU (cholecalciferol) each day. Try Child Life Vitamin D.
· Zinc lozenge: ¼ -½ of a 15mg lozenge per day. Watch out for hidden artificial colors and
sweeteners.
Cold and Flu Relief (Adults 150lbs)
1. Strictly avoid all dairy.
2. Hydration: drink 1qt of water per 50lbs of body weight not to go over 3qts per day.
3. Supplementation (spread dosages throughout the day & take with meals)
· Take a high potency multiple.
· Lauricidin: 3 scoops per day.
· Vitamin C: 6000mg per day or to bowel tolerance. Try Emergen-C it helps you stay hydrated,
and is effervescent-settling to the stomach. Careful! Too much will give you diarrhea.
· Vitamin D3: 10000IU (cholecalciferol) for 3 days then drop to 5000IU each day.
· Echinacea: 150mg, 6 times per day.
· Zinc Lozenges: Take 4-6, 15mg zinc lozenges for a few days.
· If you have no appetite or experience nausea/vomiting, sip on Green’s First or Nanogreens
throughout the day. They’re both very nutritious and help to settle the stomach. Try them
cold or warm.
· Do you have upper respiratory symptoms or a phlegmy cough? Add Elderberry syrup in a product called “Sambucal” per label instructions.
Relief for kids (40-100lbs)
· #1 and #2 are the same.
· Supplementation (spread dosages throughout the day & take with meals)
· Take a high potency multiple vitamin.
· Lauricidin: take 1-2 scoops per day.
· Vitamin C: take 500-1000mg per day. Try Emergen-C or Child Life Vitamin C for kids.
· Vitamin D3: take 1000IU (cholecalciferol) each day. Try Child Life Vitamin D.
· Echinacea: Find a children’s version at your health food store and take as recommended
on the bottle. Watch out for hidden artificial colors and sweeteners.
· Zinc Lozenges: Take 1-2, 15mg zinc lozenges for a few days. Watch out for hidden
artificial colors and sweeteners.
· If the child seems to have no appetite or experience nausea/vomiting, sip on Green’s
First or Nanogreens throughout the day. They’re both very nutritious and help to settle
the stomach. Try them cold or warm.
· Are there upper respiratory symptoms or a phlegmy cough? Add Elderberry syrup in a
product called “Sambucal” per label instructions.
Get adjusted by your chiropractor. Chiropractors do not treat fevers. A chiropractor
detects and corrects the vertebral subluxation complex. If there is restriction in vertebral
segments this can cause interference with the nervous system. Therefore, maintaining or
returning to a normal body temperature may be impaired. Once the proper chiropractic
adjustment is given the body usually responds in a short period of time. This is not to say
that a fever will break, as in some cases the fever will actually rise allowing the body to
better fight off invading bacteria before returning to normal at a later period of time.6

References:
1. Kaneshiro, Neil. MD. Fever. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. January 29,
2010 http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003090.htm. Accessed
Feb. 21, 2012
2. Schmitt, Barton D. MD. “Fever Phobia: Misconceptions of Parents About Fevers” Am J Dis Child. 1980;134(2):176-181.
3. Crocetti, Michael MD., Moghbeli, Nooshi BA, et.al. Fever Phobis Revisited: Have Parental Misconceptions About Fever Changed in 20 Years? American Academy of Pediatrics. July 14, 2000
4. Dr. Mercola, Joseph, “Do you make this common mistake when your child is sick?”
February 3, 2011 http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/02/03/the-benefitsof-fever.aspx. Accessed February 21, 2012.
5. University of Maryland schools of medicine and pharmacy. Pharmacotherapy, December 2000; 20:1417-1422
6. Zell, Paul D.C. Fevers. International Chiropractic Pediatric Association. March/April 2001

Federal Law requires that we warn you of the following:
1. Your individual health status and any required health care treatments can only be properly addressed by a professional healthcare provider of your choice.
2. The information provided in this newsletter has not been evaluated by the FDA.

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Breakfast Considerations

Adelle Davis, an American author and nutritionist, said it well “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper”. According to the annual report of the International Food Information Council, while 90% of Americans know having breakfast is important for health and function, only 49% admit to eating breakfast every day.1 Research has shown the many benefits of including breakfast in your daily routine that include weight loss, improved energy and concentration, improved physical endurance, and overall improvement of a quality diet.

After sleeping for eight hours, and being without food during the night, our brain and muscles need energy and fuel to function. Breaking this fast with consumption of a healthy meal including proteins and fats instead of a high carbohydrate meal has been shown to have the most benefit.

A study published by the International Journal of Obesity, examined the influence of the type of foods and specific timing of intake on the development of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, insulin resistance and other cardiovascular disease-risk factors. These risk factors that occur together are known as “Metabolic Syndrome”. This research revealed that a carbohydrate-rich diet in the morning led to consuming a high-fat meal at the end of the day and saw increased weight gain, and other markers of the metabolic syndrome. On the contrary, fat intake at the time of waking seems to turn on fat metabolism very efficiently and also turns on the ability to respond to different types of food later in the day2. The research concluded that the first meal you have appears to program your metabolism for the rest of the day. And, that a meal higher in fat content in the morning is best for your body’s ability to efficiently breakdown and utilize the components of a mixed diet, including carbohydrates, fats, and protein, throughout the day.

Sources of fat which you would benefit most from come from plant sources such as olive oil, coconut oil, and canola oil, fish, nuts, seeds, nut butters, and avocados. These types of fat are known to lower cholesterol and triglycerides, increase energy, improve depression, and decrease inflammation. Eating more protein and fat helps keep the metabolic rate high, and the omega-3 fatty acids can actually help the body burn visceral abdominal fat.4

Eggs are a great source of protein and fat for a morning breakfast choice. But, many people have the misconception regarding the egg and cholesterol connection. Numerous studies have supported that eggs have virtually nothing to do with raising your cholesterol. Some egg studies showed that eating 3 eggs a day for 30 days did increase the cholesterol but by producing HDL (good) cholesterol and bigger sized particles of LDL (bad) cholesterol. The larger sized LDL particles had no effect on the ratio between LDL and HDL, which suggests no major change in coronary risk.3
One large egg contains 6 grams of high-quality protein (in both the yolk and the white). The yolk is also a source of zinc, B vitamins, vitamin A, iron, and other nutrients!

What should you avoid for breakfast? You can easily eliminate all forms of grain-based cereal off of your grocery list. When flour is refined to make cereal, the most nutritious part of the grain is removed, so the flour is essentially becomes a form of sugar deficient of minerals and vitamins. According to a report from Yale University’ Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, some cereals with the poorest ratings have health claims on the box and much of these are heavily marketed toward children. “Cereals marketed to kids have 85 percent more sugar, 65 percent less fiber and 60 percent more sodium than those aimed at adults.5

Not sure where to start or need further advice? Getting a full comprehensive blood analysis can help determine what exactly you need to be consuming from a dietary and supplement standpoint and also help point out what you need to be avoiding. Working with a seasoned natural health care provider, such as Dr. Fair, can help guide you to make the right choices for what is best for you.

For now, if you don’t eat breakfast…start! If you think you’ve been eating the wrong type of breakfast, try these ideas.

• Two poached eggs over 1/4 avocado drizzled with a little balsamic or fresh lemon.
• Free-range egg fried in just a touch of palm oil, topped with chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, pepper and onions…. served with a few strawberries or blueberries…add a couple pieces of nitrate free bacon (try Applegate Farm varieties)
• 1 avocado, chopped with salt, pepper and cumin to taste. Mix with chopped mango.
• 4-6oz unsweetened coconut milk blended with 1 scoop of Jay Robb egg protein powder (chocolate or vanilla) and ½ cup crushed ice.
• AM a rush? Night before hard-broil eggs, eat with a pinch of sea salt.
• For a change:
o Try a glass of coconut or almond milk in the morning rather than cow’s milk. So Delicious has several varieties to choose from: original, unsweetened and vanilla. Original or Vanilla are the best for drinking purposes while Unsweetened is best for cooking.
o Use coconut oil to spread on bread instead of butter.
• Thought we would throw this in for fun!
o Dairy Free Hot Chocolate
1 cup So Delicious™ Coconut Milk Beverage
1 Tbsp. cocoa powder (baking)
1 tsp. unrefined coconut oil (room temperature)
1 Tbsp. unrefined sugar
o Pour milk into medium saucepan and begin warming up.
Whisk cocoa into the milk. Continue to whisk while adding coconut oil and sweetener.
Let it cook about 4-5 minutes until it starts to bubble just a bit. Pour into a mug and enjoy.

Get adjusted by your chiropractor. Chiropractors do not treat poor diets; however, a chiropractor detects and corrects the vertebral subluxation complex. If there is restriction in vertebral segments this can cause interference with the nervous system. Therefore, maintaining or returning to normal function may help your body be more efficient with the nourishment you do provide it. Once the proper chiropractic adjustment is given the body usually responds in a short period of time.

References:
1. Birkbeck, John. Report Shows Many People Skip Breakfast. Everybody Nutrition News. Institute of Food Nutrition and Human Health, Massey University. June 2007
2. Bray et al. Time-of-day-dependent dietary fat consumption influences multiple cardiometabolic syndrome parameters in mice. International Journal of Obesity, 2010
3. University of California Berkeley. The Sunny Side of Egg. Wellness Letter, March 2008. http://www.wellnessletter.com/html/wl/2008/wlFeatured0308.html accessed on 27, Dec. 2011
4 Kleiner, Susan. The Powerfood Nutrition Plan: The Guy’s Guide to Getting Stronger, Leaner, Smarter, Healthier, Better Looking, Better Sex with Food! Rodale, 2005
5. Hellmich, Nancy. Kids’ cereals pour on the sugar and sodium. USA Today. 10/25/2009

Federal Law requires that we warn you of the following:
1. Your individual health status and any required health care treatments can only be properly addressed by a professional healthcare provider of your choice.
2. The information provided in this newsletter has not been evaluated by the FDA.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment